How to ping to a file and with a timestamp

How to ping to a file and with a timestamp

Have you ever had the need to ping to a file but also know when the pings happened so you can analyze the data better. Here is on example :

Open Notepad and input the following :

@ECHO OFF
:LOOPSTART
echo %time% >> ping.txt
echo %time%
ping 172.17.10.11 -n 10 >> ping.txt
GOTO LOOPSTART

Change the IP Address to the desired one and also change the name of the output file if needed ( currently it is ping.txt ). It will be created in the directory from which you are running the batch file. Also note that the current batch file will do the ping infinitely. If you want to change that remove the “-n”. The number 10 specifies how many pings it will do before timestamping and starting on the new roll.

Now save the Notepad file as ping.bat ( or a different name ) and run it. The output should look like that :

You can also download a sample batch file and edit it for your own needs. Click here.

16:00:15,91

Pinging 172.17.10.11 with 32 bytes of data:
Reply from 172.17.10.11: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128
Reply from 172.17.10.11: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128
Reply from 172.17.10.11: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128
Reply from 172.17.10.11: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128
Reply from 172.17.10.11: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128
Reply from 172.17.10.11: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128
Reply from 172.17.10.11: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128
Reply from 172.17.10.11: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128
Reply from 172.17.10.11: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128
Reply from 172.17.10.11: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128

Ping statistics for 172.17.10.11:
Packets: Sent = 10, Received = 10, Lost = 0 (0% loss),
Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
Minimum = 0ms, Maximum = 0ms, Average = 0ms
16:00:24,98

Pinging 172.17.10.11 with 32 bytes of data:
Reply from 172.17.10.11: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128
Reply from 172.17.10.11: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128
Reply from 172.17.10.11: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128
Reply from 172.17.10.11: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128
Reply from 172.17.10.11: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128
Reply from 172.17.10.11: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128
Reply from 172.17.10.11: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128
Reply from 172.17.10.11: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128
Reply from 172.17.10.11: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128
Reply from 172.17.10.11: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128

Ping statistics for 172.17.10.11:
Packets: Sent = 10, Received = 10, Lost = 0 (0% loss),
Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
Minimum = 0ms, Maximum = 0ms, Average = 0ms
16:00:34,01

Pinging 172.17.10.11 with 32 bytes of data:
Reply from 172.17.10.11: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128
Reply from 172.17.10.11: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128
Reply from 172.17.10.11: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128
Reply from 172.17.10.11: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128
Reply from 172.17.10.11: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128
Reply from 172.17.10.11: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128

 

Clear Cached Credentials in Windows

Clear Cached Credentials in Windows

How to Clear Cached Credentials in Windows. Wonder where all the “Remember Password” ticks are going? They go to the Stored User Names and Passwords.

Open Command Prompt

Type rundll32.exe keymgr.dll, KRShowKeyMgr

This will bring the Stored User Names and Passwords. You will see all your saved credentials. You can view/edit/remove them and also Backup and Restore them in and from credential backup files ( .crd ). Clearing passwords is used in various troubleshooting scenarios for different software.

Clear Cached Credentials in Windows

Here is a link of a problem with Microsoft Lync 2010 client that cannot present the option of specifying username and is resolved by clearing the cached credentials that Lync uses.

http://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/ocsclients/thread/87dd5c8a-9bfe-4b58-98bf-3782f451c14a

NATO phonetic alphabet

NATO phonetic alphabet

NATO phonetic alphabet has been used not only by the military and government organizations but from the IT servicehesks, helpdesks and call centers. It helps understanding what the other person really means when he says “N” or “M” for example or “P” or “B”.

Letter      Code Word

A        Alpha

B        Bravo

C        Charlie

D        Delta

E        Echo

F        Foxtrot

G       Golf

H       Hotel

I        India

J       Juliet

K       Kilo

L       Lima

M      Mike ( or Mother )

N      November

O      Oscar

P      Papa

Q      Quebec

R      Romeo

S      Sierra

T      Tango

U     Uniform

V      Victor

W     Whiskey

X      X-Ray

Y      Yankee

Z      Zulu

Here is the old Radiotelephony phonetic alphabet which is unchanged.

Nato Phonetic Alphabet

Here is the Wikipedia link: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NATO_phonetic_alphabet

English names for the characters in both US and British keyboards

English names for the characters in both US and British keyboards

English names for the characters in both US and British keyboards contain some tricky and hard to remember symbols like ~ ` or ^. Here is a useful list of them explained. Red quotes stand for the British.

~ tilde (sounds like til-da); be prepared to explain to   computer-illiterate people saying “you know, the wave-shaped   thingy”
! exclamation; commonly read as bang in case of #!/bin/sh
@ at
# pound; but commonly read as shee in case of #!/bin/sh, not   sure why, pound is the American, UK is hash
£ pound
$ Dollar
% Percent
^ caret; not many people know this word so be prepared to   say “no, not carrot; it’s the character above 6, an arrow pointing   up”
& Ampersand
* star; some read asterisk
( opening parenthesis (some may shorten it saying paren), open bracket
) closing parenthesis, close bracket
_ underscore; once I heard people say underbar
+ Plus
minus; as symbol before arguments in commands, some people   including me read dash, easier to say one syllable,   or hyphen
= Equals
` backtick or backquote
{ opening brace, open curly bracket
} closing brace, close curly bracket
[ opening bracket, open square bracket
] closing bracket, close square bracket
| pipe or vertical bar
\ backslash; be prepared to explain to some   computer-illiterate people
: colon
; semicolon
double quote
single quote
< less than; some may read left angle bracket
> greater than
, comma
. dot; period if in English text
? question mark
/ slash or forward slash; some computer-illiterate people   may be confused about / and \
space
(), [] and {} may also be called brackets in general. In that case, they   specifically call [] square brackets and {} curly brackets. I never like   this. Open and Closing may also be called left and right.